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Women in History

by Lynne Belluscio

 As I put together the text for the new exhibit “Remember the Ladies” I have put together a timeline of women’s history on which I can place the stories of the women of LeRoy.  For example I know that when Charlotte LeRoy’s father died, his estate - -which was sizable - - passed on to Charlotte and her sister.  But the big question, is whether Charlotte was able to claim her inheritance, or did it pass to her husband Jacob, because married women could not own property, or earn or inherit money in their own right until New York State passed the Married Women’s Property Act of 1848. So I have to go back and find out when her father died and where he died.  If he died in New York after 1848, then Charlotte should have become a wealthy lady.  I wonder now about Emily Ingham. She married Phineas Staunton in 1847, so did he become the owner of Ingham University?  And because Emily’s sister Marietta never married, was she Phineas’ business partner?  So here are some interesting points of women’s history:

1796 – Amelia Simmons publishes the first American cookbook

1797 – Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton is part of a group that founds the Society for the Relief of Poor Widows.  She founds the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph in 1809 and is considered the founder of the parochial school system in the United States.

1805 – Sacagawea serves as guide and interpreter for the Lewis and Clark expedition through the unchartered West.  The journey takes two years

1813 – Mary Young Pickersgill makes the flag that serves as the inspiration

for Francis Scott Key’s “The Star Spangled Banner.”

1816 – Factory workers in the United States number 100,000. Two thirds of them are women and children. They are paid significantly less than men.

1820 – of 874,000 black women in the United States, 86 % are enslaved.

1821 – Emma Willard opens the Troy Female Seminary.

1824 - Anna Claypoole Peale and Sarah Miriam Peale  are both elected to the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.

 

 

 

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